Daisies {InstaScience}

Daisies are a composite flower and each bloom consists of small flowers called florets in the center. Come learn about this amazing flower in an instant!

Around this time of year we start to see Pumpkin Spiced Lattes and fall colored floral arrangements. Most of these flower bunches include a few daisies thanks to their variety of fall-ish colors. These flowers can be red, pink, purple, yellow, or orange. But their most iconic look is white with a yellow center.

With daisies, what we see as one flower is actually a composite flower. Each daisy bloom consists of small flowers called florets in the center. This area is called the flower head or floral disc. The actual daisy flowers are quite small and have tubular shape. The flower head is surrounded by a circle of brightly colored ray flowers which serve to attract insects.

The daisy has green leaves, some of which are smooth while other varieties are covered with hairs on the surface. The leaves of most of the species of daisy are divided in several lobes that come together to form rosette at the base of the stem. Daisy leaves are edible and rich in Vitamin C. They are often added to salads to punch up the flavor.

Daises can grow to be from 3 inches to 4 feet in height. These super hardy plants can grow in almost every environment, so chances are you have a field of daisies growing somewhere near you!

Fun Fact

The word daisy is derived from the Old English words “daes eage, which mean “day’s eye.” The flower was named this because of the way the blooms close their petals in the evening and open again at dawn to mark the start of the new day.

Learn More at the Following Website Links

  • http://www.housebeautiful.com/lifestyle/gardening/g2496/daisy-fun-facts/?slide=10
  • http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/8481965/Top-10-facts-about-daisies.html
  • http://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/daisy_facts/596/
  • http://justfunfacts.com/interesting-facts-about-daisies/

 

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